What makes a free kick direct or indirect?

Types of Free Kicks

When a free kick is awarded, the team that has been fouled has the opportunity to take a direct or indirect kick. A direct free kick means that the team can score by kicking the ball into the net without it first touching another player. An indirect free kick means that another player must touch the ball before it can go into the net, and it is usually awarded when there is less serious foul committed.

There are two types of fouls that can lead to a direct free kick: kicking or attempting to kick an opponent, and tripping an opponent. If any of these occur within the penalty area, then a penalty kick is given instead. A direct freekick can also be given if an opponent handlees the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper).
Indirect free kicks are usually given for more minor infringements such as dangerous play, holding onto the shirt of another player etc. When an indirect freekick is taken, the kicker cannot score directly – if they do, a goal-kick is awarded to the other team. Instead, they must pass it to another teammate who then has a chance of scoring.

Direct Free Kick

When most people think of a free kick, they envision a direct free kick. This is the type of een Directe en Indirecte Vrije Trap that allows the kicker to shoot directly at the goal with the hope of scoring. A direct free kick is awarded to the fouled team if a player from the other team commits any of the following offenses: holding, pushing, kicking, tripping, jumping at, charging, striking or handling the ball (unless it is intentional).

However, if any of those offenses are committed by a defender within their own penalty area, a penalty kick is awarded instead. A direct free kick can also be awarded for more serious offenses such as deliberate fouls (i.e. shirt pulling), dangerous play or spitting at another player. If the referee deems a foul to be worthy of a yellow card but not a red card, he will award a direct free kick rather than show the player a card.

An indirect free kick is usually given when a goalkeeper commits an offense within his own penalty area such as: touching the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately played back to him by a teammate, handling the ball outside of his penalty area or picking up the ball after he has dropped it inside his own six-yard box. An indirect free kick is also awarded if a player in his own half commits one of the following offenses: playing in a dangerous manner, impeding an opponent’s progress or preventing the goalkeeper from releasing the ball into play.

Indirect Free Kick

When the referee awards a free kick, the team that did not commit the foul gets to decide whether the kick will be direct or indirect. A direct free kick means that the team can score by kicking the ball directly into the goal; an indirect free kick means that someone else on the team must touch the ball before it can go into the goal.

The main difference between a direct and indirect free kick is that, with a direct free kick, the kicker can score directly; with an indirect free kick, someone else on the team must touch it before it goes in.

There are a few other differences:

  • With a direct free kick, opponents must stay 10 yards away from where the ball is being kicked; with an indirect free kick, they only have to stay 6 yards away.
  • If an indirect free kick is taken inside the penalty area, and it goes out of bounds without being touched by anyone else, it’s a cornerkick; if it’s a direct free kick outside of the penalty area and it goes out of bounds without being touched by anyone else, play stops and resumes with a goal kick for whichever team is defending that end of the field.
  • A goalkeeper cannot pick up an indirect free kick; if he does, it’s a yellow card (and possibly a red card if he does it again within 12 months).

Angles for a Direct Free Kick

When the referee awards a direct free kick, the ball can be kicked directly into the goal for a score. An indirect free kick must be touched by another player before it can go into the goal.

There are two types of fouls that can result in a direct free kick: kicking or tripping an opponent, or handling the ball (except by the goalkeeper within his own penalty area). A direct free kick is also awarded if a player is fouled from behind in his own half of the field.

The following offenses result in an indirect free kick: dangerous play, obstruction, offside, and goalkeeper violations. An indirect free kick is also awarded if a player is fouled while he is not in control of the ball.

Angles for an Indirect Free Kick

When a free kick is taken from within the six-yard box, it is an indirect free kick. An indirect free kick is also awarded if the referee decides a player committed a minor infraction that did not warrant a direct free kick. In this case, the ball must be touched by another player before it can enter the goal. On an indirect free kick, the ball cannot be shot directly into the goal; it must touch another player first.

Conclusion

A free kick is either direct or indirect depending on how it is taken. If the free kick is taken from within the six-yard box, then it is an indirect free kick. If the free kick is taken outside of the six-yard box, then it is a direct free kick.

As you can see, there are a few key factors that determine whether a free kick is direct or indirect. By understanding these rules, you can be sure to make the most of any free kick opportunities that come your way. So get out there and start practicing those free kicks!