Can Medical Cannabis Help Reduce Stress?

Medical cannabis is becoming more and more popular as a way to deal with stress and Toronto dispensary workers say they’re seeing an uptick in customers looking for weed to help them chill out.

A lot of people are turning to cannabis as an alternative to prescription medications, which can have a lot of side effects. In this blog post, we will take a look at the evidence that suggests cannabis can help reduce stress levels.

1: Becoming more popular

A lot of people suffer from stress these days. Stress can come from work, family, or other aspects of life. It can be hard to deal with, and it can lead to health problems if not managed properly.

Medical cannabis is becoming more popular as a way to deal with stress. A lot of people are turning to cannabis as an alternative to prescription medications, which can have a lot of side effects. In this blog post, we will take a look at the evidence that suggests cannabis can help reduce stress levels.

Cannabis has been shown to have a positive effect on the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS). The ECS is responsible for regulating many important functions in the body, including stress response.

2: The ECS

Cannabis has been shown to have a positive effect on the body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS). The ECS is responsible for regulating many important functions in the body, including stress response.

There is a lot of evidence that suggests the ECS plays a role in how we respond to stress. One study found that CBD, a compound found in cannabis, was able to reduce stress levels in rats. CBD works by interacting with the ECS and helping to regulate its function.

Another study looked at the effects of THC, another compound found in cannabis. THC was found to decrease cortisol levels, which are often elevated during times of stress. This suggests that THC may be able to help reduce the body’s stress response.

3: Human studies

There have also been a few studies conducted on humans that suggest cannabis may help reduce stress. One study found that people who used cannabis had lower levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, in their bodies. This suggests that cannabis may help to reduce the body’s stress response.

Another study looked at how people felt after using cannabis. The participants reported feeling less stressed after using cannabis. This suggests that cannabis can help to reduce stress levels in people who use it.

The evidence from these studies suggests that medical cannabis may be able to help reduce stress levels. If you are struggling with stress, talk to your doctor about whether medical cannabis could be right for you.

4: Potential side effects

While medical cannabis may be able to help reduce stress levels, it is important to remember that it is a medication and it can have side effects. The most common side effect of cannabis is fatigue. Other potential side effects include dry mouth, red eyes, and impaired memory and judgment.

It is also important to remember that cannabis can interact with other medications you are taking. If you are taking any prescription medications, talk to your doctor before using cannabis.

Cannabis is a safe and effective way to treat stress for many people. However, it is important to remember that it is a medication and it can have side effects. If you are considering using medical cannabis to treat your stress, talk to your doctor about whether it is right for you.

Sources:

  • (n.d.). Retrieved from Healthline website: Cannabidiol (CBD): What Does It Do? How Might It Help? – Healthline.
  • Russo, E. B. (2011, August). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. Retrieved from British Journal of Pharmacology website: Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects | British Journal of Pharmacology | full text article – bjp.org.uk.
  • Wilkinson, S., Radwan, M., Dallaire, J., & Mechoulam, R. (2007, February). Effects of cannabidiol on behavioral and cardiovascular responses to chronic stress in rats. Retrieved from Behavioral Brain Research website: Effects of cannabidiol on behavioral and cardiovascular responses to chronic stress in rats | Behavioral Brain Research | full text article – sciencedirect.